Categories & Criteria

The Australian Good Design Awards is one of the most diverse design award programs in the industry spanning 12 overarching Design Disciplines and covering more than 30 sub-categories.

The Evaluation Criteria used by the Jury have been specifically developed for each Design Discipline and are reviewed and refined each year to ensure they remain relevant to the design sector and reflect the rapidly changing nature of professional design practice.

Entries represent projects across broad sectors and industries and cover everything from the design of everyday products we use, the clothes we wear, the services we interact with and the places and spaces we occupy, to the design of the processes and systems that underpin our businesses, industries, economies and social habits.

Top Left: Bankwest Stadium, Good Design Award Gold Winner, Commercial and Residential Design Category. Top Right: Ion Endoluminal System, Good Design Award Gold Winner, Medical and Scientific Category. Bottom Left: Latch C, Good Design Award Best in Class, Hardware and Building Category. Bottom Right: 545 Queen Street Redevelopment, Good Design Award Gold Winner, Interior Design Category.
  • Overarching Criteria
  • Sustainability Criteria
  • Architecture
  • Communication
  • Digital
  • Engineering
  • Fashion Impact
  • Next Gen
  • Precincts
  • Product
  • Service
  • Social Impact
  • Strategy
  • New: Design Research
  • EXCELLENCE IN DESIGN AND INNOVATION TO CREATE POSITIVE IMPACT

    The Australian Good Design Awards evaluates all entries based on three overarching design criteria:

    • GOOD DESIGN,
    • DESIGN INNOVATION, and
    • DESIGN IMPACT.

    Further to this, Judges are asked to evaluate each entry based on specific evaluation criteria aligned to each of the 12 Design Disciplines listed here.


    Evaluation Criteria

    • GOOD DESIGN

      • Does the entry satisfy the criteria for Good Design in its specific Design Discipline?
      • Please refer to the category-specific Evaluation Criteria for Good Design for the 12 Design Disciplines listed here on the left hand side.
    • DESIGN INNOVATION

      • Does the entry advance the design profession and push the boundaries of new and innovative thinking in design practice?
      • Is the entry truly unique, imaginative and innovative and does it offer a new and groundbreaking value proposition with potential world-first features?
      • Does the entry use new systems, materials, processes and/or technology in a clever, imaginative and original manner?
    • DESIGN IMPACT

      • Social Impact: Does the entry have the potential to make a significant positive impact on society? Will it improve the quality of life for people and our planet and help contribute to a better, safer and more prosperous world?
      • Commercial Impact: Does the entry have the potential to make a significant positive impact on business performance? Will the investment in design result in a significant increase in market share, sales and/or customer loyalty?
      • Environmental Impact: Does the entry have the potential to make a significant positive impact on the environment? Will the design set a new benchmark for sustainable design and help contribute to a better and more sustainable future?
  • EXCELLENCE IN DESIGN FOR SUSTAINABILITY 

    Established in 2007, the Good Design Award for Sustainability is awarded to an entry that represents the highest level of excellence in sustainable design practice. The Award is limited to only one recipient that, in the judge’s opinion, will have a positive impact in promoting excellence in sustainable design.


    Evaluation Criteria

    • Was there a clear objective by the design team to follow design-for-sustainability best practice?

    • Does the design use materials and processes that have the least possible impact on our planet in the way the product, service, system or project has been constructed, in its day to day use and at the end of its life cycle?

    • Has the product, service, system or project achieved third party certification for its sustainability initiatives?

    • Have quantifiable sustainable outcomes been achieved through the design?

    • Does the design deliver leading-edge sustainability innovations?

    • Is there potential for the design’s sustainability features to be adopted by others or set new benchmarks?

    • Does the design show leadership and/or stewardship of environmental and social justice issues?

    • Will the design’s sustainability initiatives result in a substantial impact?

    • Is there sufficient evidence that the design project is supported by an organisation that has adopted sustainability principles into its mission, vision and values?

    • Is there sufficient evidence that the organisation is measuring the social and environmental impacts and benefits alongside the financial impacts and benefits to demonstrate a clear integrated bottom line approach?

  • ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

    Includes architecture, interior design, landscape design, urban design, public spaces and facilities, office and retail fit outs, street equipment, environments and exhibition design.

    Sub-categories include:

    1. Interior Design

      Includes residential and commercial interior design and architecture.

    2. Commercial and Residential Architecture

      Includes commercial and residential architectural projects.

    3. Urban Design and Public Spaces

      Includes landscape design, special design, exhibition design, urban design and planning, public space design, playground design etc.


    Supporting materials include:

    • Plans and layouts of the project (in PDF format)
    • Date of construction completion
    • Exact address and location of project

    Please note: A site inspection may be required at a later stage should the Jury deem this necessary.


    Evaluation Criteria

    • FORM

      • Is the design appealing and desirable for the intended market?
      • Is the design visually resolved and does it evoke an emotional connection?
      • Does the form support the function and use of the project intuitively?
      • Does it respond to its environment from a visual, contextual and cultural perspective?
    • FUNCTION

      • Does the design perform the function it was originally designed for?
      • Is the design easy to navigate and use?
      • Will the design advance the overall user experience?
    • SAFETY

      • Does the design protect the user from harm?
      • Does the design raise any particular safety concerns?
      • Does the design comply with all applicable standards and regulations?
    • SUSTAINABILITY

      • Has the project followed design for sustainability best practice?
      • Is the project built using materials and processes that have the least possible impact
      • on the environment?
      • Is the project water, material or energy efficient in its day-to-day use?
    • QUALITY

      • Has the project been well constructed and finished?
      • Does the quality of the project correspond with the desired price point and/or investment?
      • Are the chosen materials and construction techniques appropriate?
    • COMMERCIALITY

      • Does the project represent good value for money at the intended price point
        and/or investment?
      • Is the design likely to increase the brand value and/or community standing of the client organisation?
      • Is the design likely to result in a significant economic and/or social return on the investment made on design?
    • Innovation

      • Is the design new and original?
      • Does the design use new materials and technology in a clever way?
      • Does the design have any world first features?
  • COMMUNICATION DESIGN

    Includes corporate branding and identity, advertising campaign design, commercial art, graphic design, primary, secondary and tertiary packaging, POS displays, signage, wayfinding and print media.

    Sub-categories include:

    1. Print

      Includes book design, corporate publishing, poster design, merchandising, annual reports, magazine design, brochure design, direct mailing campaigns, print advertisements, catalogues, journals, currency and coin design, stamps and more.

    2. Packaging Design

      Includes food packaging, industrial packaging, consumer goods packaging, point-of-sale merchandise, health and beauty packaging and more.

    3. Branding and Identity

      Includes corporate identity design, branding, typography, design strategy, signage, wayfinding and more.

    4. Advertising

      Includes advertising campaigns, integrated campaigns, TV commercials, social media campaigns and more.


    Evaluation Criteria

    • Design

      • Is the design styled to be appealing and desirable for the intended market?
      • Is the design visually resolved and does it evoke an emotional connection?
      • Does the design convey the function and use unambiguously and intuitively?
    • Usability

      • Does the design perform the function it was designed for?
      • Is the design easy to use and understand?
      • Does the design advance the user experience?
    • Creativity and Innovation

      • Is the design new and original?
      • Does the design use materials and processes in a new and clever way?
      • Does the design have any world first features?
    • Content and Quality

      • Has the design been professionally executed and finished?
      • Is the content appropriate and professionally written for the intended market?
      • Is the information architecture arranged in an intuitive and easy to digest manner?
    • Commerciality

      • Does the quality of design correspond with the desired price point being offered?
      • Is the design likely to increase the brand value of the company?
      • Is the design likely to result in a return on the investment made on design?
  • DIGITAL DESIGN

    Proudly presented by SAE Qantm Creative Media Institute. 

    Includes software, websites and online portals, user interfaces, smartphone applications, animations, gaming and digital media.

    Sub-categories include:

    1. App and Software Design

      Includes the design of applications for smartphones, tablets etc. and software systems and applications etc.

    2. Game Design and Animation

      Includes game design, character design, set design etc.

    3. Interface Design

      Includes user interface design for products, systems and services, virtual interfaces, interaction design etc.

    4. Web Design and Development

      Includes website design and development, micro-sites, digital campaigns, social media campaigns etc.


    Supporting materials include:

    • Access to any logins, passwords, apps or software required to test and fully assess the entry.

    Evaluation Criteria

    • Design

      • Is the design styled to be appealing and desirable for the intended market?
      • Is the design visually resolved and does it evoke an emotional connection?
      • Does the design convey the function and use unambiguously and intuitively?
    • Usability

      • Does the design perform the function it was designed for?
      • Is the design easy to use and understand?
      • Does the design advance the user experience?
    • Creativity and Innovation

      • Is the design new and original?
      • Does the design use technology in a clever way?
      • Does the design have any world first features?
    • Content and Quality

      • Has the design been professionally executed and finished?
      • Is the content appropriate and professionally written for the intended market?
      • Is the information architecture arranged in an intuitive and easy to digest manner?
    • Commerciality

      • Does the quality of design correspond with the desired price point offered?
      • Is the design likely to increase the brand value of the company?
      • Is the design likely to result in a return on the investment made on design?
  • ENGINEERING DESIGN

    Proudly Founded and Presented by Aurecon.

    Includes projects that represent excellence in all areas of Engineering Design. There are no sub-categories in the Engineering Design discipline however, entries will be accepted that cover mechanical engineering design, electronic design, agricultural engineering, automotive engineering, heavy engineering, systems engineering, civil engineering, naval architecture and structural engineering.


    Evaluation Criteria

    • FORM

      • Is the design styled to be appealing and desirable for the intended market / users?
      • Is the design visually resolved and does it evoke an emotional connection?
      • Does the form convey the function and use unambiguously and intuitively?
    • FUNCTION

      • Does the engineering project perform the function it was designed for?
      • Is the end product / project easy to use and understand?
      • Is it ergonomically designed and does it advance the user experience?
    • SAFETY

      • Does the design protect the user from harm?
      • Does the design safeguard against unintentional use?
      • Does the design comply with all applicable standards and regulations?
    • SUSTAINABILITY

      • Has the project been designed for disassembly and recyclability?
      • Is the project water, material and/or energy efficient in its day-to-day use?
      • Do the materials and processes used have a minimal impact on the environment?
    • QUALITY

      • Has the project been well made, finished and/or implemented?
      • Does the quality of the project correspond with the desired price point?
      • Are the chosen materials and manufacturing techniques appropriate?
    • COMMERCIALITY

      • Does the engineering project represent good value for money?
      • Is the design likely to increase the brand value of the company?
      • Is the design likely to result in a return on the investment made on design?
    • INNOVATION

      • Is the design new and original?
      • Does the design use new materials and technology in a clever way?
      • Does the design have any world first features?
  • FASHION IMPACT

    The Fashion Impact category recognises businesses that are using design and innovation to positively impact the future of the fashion industry from a sustainability perspective.

    The global estimated value of the fashion industry is a staggering $US2.4 trillion*, however behind oil, it is the most destructive industry to our planet. Not mentioning the well-known implications of fashion supply chains, it is estimated that approximately 6000kg of clothing is dumped into landfill every 10 minutes**. What are we doing to future proof our industry and the planet?

    This category recognises innovative organisations and approaches across:

    • Advocacy – public awareness, education, lobbying through film, events, conferences, campaigns.
    • Design – supply chain, innovative use of materials, production techniques, shifts to a circular economy.
    • E-platforms – that promote or aggregate sustainable fashion labels, renting, re-selling or up-cycling clothing.

    * State of Fashion Report, McKinsey & Company, 2017    **War on Waste Stories, ABC TV, 2017


    Evaluation Criteria

    • PURPOSE

      • Does the applicant have a clearly defined purpose that differentiates it from other fashion labels / brands in the marketplace?
    • PROBLEM AND SOLUTION FOCUS

      • Can the applicant clearly articulate the problem being addressed and how the solution addresses this problem through an innovative business model and solution?
    • IMPACT

      • Can the applicant define and/or measure the impact of their business on the fashion industry through metrics such as reduction in waste, improved efficiencies in supply chains, reach of initiative etc.?
    • DESIGN AESTHETIC

      • Is the overall design aesthetic appealing and desirable for the intended market?
    • INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT

      • Has the applicant engaged with the fashion industry at large to promote the initiative through stakeholder engagement, industry collaborations, PR and marketing?
  • NEXT GEN

    Proudly presented by RØDE Microphones Founder & Chairman, Mr Peter Freedman AM.

    The Next Gen category was created to inspire the next generation of designers and to help foster a culture of design, innovation and creativity.

    It is free to enter the Next Gen category and applicants are not required to pay a Winners Package Fee.

    Winners in this category receive a share of $50,000 in cash prizes:

    • Good Design Award Best in Class – $20,000  (1 winner only)
    • Good Design Award Gold Winner – $7,000  (3 winners)
    • Good Design Award Winner – $1,000 (9 winners)

    View Eligibility for Next Gen Category

    SUB-CATEGORIES INCLUDE:

    1. ARCHITECTURE DESIGN

    2. COMMUNICATION DESIGN

    3. DIGITAL DESIGN

    4. ENGINEERING DESIGN

    5. FASHION DESIGN

    6. PRODUCT DESIGN

    7. SERVICE DESIGN

    8. SOCIAL IMPACT

    9. STRATEGY DESIGN


    Evaluation Criteria

    • PURPOSE

      • Does the design address a real-world need?
      • Does it attempt to solve a legitimate problem that will have a positive impact on society, the environment and the economy?
    • EXECUTION

      • Does the design use an appropriate use of technology and is it feasible?
      • Has the design considered circular design and sustainability principles that promote social, environmental and ecological sustainability such as lifecycle, materials and production processes?
      • Is the design new and original and does it have any world-first features?
    • OUTCOME

      • To what extent does the design solve the problem and respond to the brief?
      • Does the design represent design excellence?
      • If implemented, will the design have a positive impact on society, environment and/or the economy?
  • PRECINCT DESIGN

    The Precinct Design category recognises and celebrates the critical role of design in the planning and development of new precincts.

    More than 55% of the world’s population now inhabit our cities. The UN predicts a further 2.5 billion people will live in urban areas by 2050, representing two-thirds of the world’s population. The role and importance of design to help prepare for this population influx is becoming increasingly apparent to help cities and their precincts become more functional, attractive, efficient, liveable and sustainable.

    Good design can bring a precinct and its surrounds to life, enhancing the environment, liveability, employment and social outcomes of those who live or work in the precinct and surrounding areas.

    In particular, the Jury will be looking for projects where a holistic design approach has been carefully considered to include elements such transport, education, health and other services – all designed to improve the quality of life for people and contribute to better economic, social and environmental outcomes.

    Entries in the Precinct Design category must be fully completed. Projects which are still in the concept or design phase are not eligible.


    Evaluation Criteria

    • DESIGN PROCESS AND EXECUTION

      • Has the precinct been co-designed with the beneficiaries, to create a solution that places their needs at the centre of the design?
      • Has the design been integrated with that of surrounding areas, to ensure it complements and provides the widest range of beneficiaries? Consideration should be taken of transport, education, health and other services.
      • Have planned benefits been realised, have challenges emerged which should have been foreseen?
    • PRECINCT IMPACT

      • Does the entry have the potential to make a significant positive impact on society, including an ability to be scaled (in other geographies, other demographics, etc) to bring about the same benefits?
      • Will it improve the quality of life for people and contribute to better economic, social or environmental outcomes? How has it impacted culturally?
      • Does the project have a proven track record of making a positive social impact on the lives of the beneficiaries, other impacted stakeholders and on society more broadly?
    • SUSTAINABILITY

      Has the project followed design for sustainability best practice, including:

      • Material and process selection that minimises the impact on the environment,
      • Encouraging the development of the circular economy; and
      • Being water, material and/or energy efficient?
  • PRODUCT DESIGN

    Includes industrial design, consumer product design, furniture design, software-electronics design, engineering design, medical device design and automotive and transport design.

    Sub-categories include:

    1. Domestic Appliances

      Includes small appliances, white goods, brown goods, home heaters and air conditioners, floor care, barbeques and personal care products.

    2. Consumer Electronics

      Includes televisions, home theatre systems, computers, phones, mobile devices, digital cameras, gaming consoles and electronic accessories.

    3. Automotive and Transport

      Includes automotive vehicles, automotive components, motorcycles, buses, trains, trucks, aircraft, watercraft and other modes of transport.

    4. Commercial and Industrial

      Includes professional instruments, office products, financial registers, production and safety equipment, earthmoving, mining and agricultural machinery.

    5. Medical and Scientific

      Includes medical devices, laboratory equipment, scientific instruments, hospital furniture, therapeutic goods and home health care.

    6. Hardware and Building

      Includes home hardware, power tools, garden and lawn care, pool care, home security, building products, bathroom ware, plumbing, lighting systems and industrial fittings.

    7. Furniture and Lighting

      Includes domestic and commercial furniture, workstations, indoor and outdoor lighting, architectural hardware, materials and textiles.

    8. Sport and Lifestyle

      Includes professional and recreational sporting equipment, bicycles, sporting apparel, shoes, camping gear, baby and children’s goods, toys, scooters and trikes, travel bags and suitcases.

    9. Housewares and Objects

      Includes tableware, kitchen utensils, cookware, laundry accessories, home décor, eyewear, watches, travel and leather goods.


    Supporting Materials in the Product Design category typically include a working sample of the product(s) for hands on evaluation, however, due to ongoing restrictions samples will not be required for 2021.

    Entries will be assessed under a new hybrid evaluation system. Jurors may request product samples and further discussion with the applicant if they deem this necessary.


    Evaluation Criteria

    • Form

      • Is the design styled to be appealing and desirable for the intended market?
      • Is the design visually resolved and does it evoke an emotional connection?
      • Does the form convey the function and use unambiguously and intuitively?
    • Function

      • Does the product perform the function it was designed for?
      • Is the product easy to use and understand?
      • Is it ergonomically designed and does it advance the user experience?
    • Safety

      • Does the design protect the user from harm?
      • Does the design safeguard against unintentional use?
      • Does the design comply with all applicable standards and regulations?
    • Sustainability

      • Has the product been designed for disassembly and recyclability?
      • Is the product water, material and/or energy efficient in its day-to-day use?
      • Do the materials and processes used have a minimal impact on the environment?
    • Quality

      • Has the product been well made and finished?
      • Does the quality of the product correspond with the desired price point?
      • Are the chosen materials and manufacturing techniques appropriate?
    • Commerciality

      • Does the product represent good value for money at the intended price point?
      • Is the design likely to increase the brand value of the company?
      • Is the design likely to result in a return on the investment made on design?
    • Innovation

      • Is the design new and original?
      • Does the design use new materials and technology in a clever way?
      • Does the design have any world first features?
  • SERVICE DESIGN

    Includes the design of services and systems for the private and public sector, education and government agencies. Sectors covered include banking, financial services, legal services, tourism services, health and medical services, insurance services and more.

    Sub-categories include:

    1. Commercial Services

      Includes the design of systems and services for the private sector.

    2. Public Sector Services

      Includes the design of systems and services for the public sector.

    3. Education Services

      Includes the design of systems and services for the education sector.


    Evaluation Criteria

    • Design Process

      • Has the end-to-end user journey and the problem/opportunity been clearly defined, articulated and documented?
      • Has a suitable design approach been adopted with all elements of the service considered as part of an integrated system?
      • Has an appropriate prototyping process been adopted early in the service development process to highlight any potential failures and to ensure the service was fit for purpose?
    • Execution

      • Has the design concept been well executed and implemented and is there a sense of purity, integration, elegance and efficiency in the service?
      • Are staff and/or service providers engaged to deliver, own and improve the experience?
      • Are all the elements, touch points and/or physical objects of the service that should be connected, connected and systemized in an intelligent and logical way?
    • Experience

      • Has each element in the service been considered as an experience that contributes in a positive way to the overall value of the service?
      • Is the experience useful, usable and enjoyable? Does the service perform the function it was designed for in a simple, intuitive way?
      • Does the service advance the user experience? Is it a new, positive user experience?
    • Commerciality

      • Does the service have the potential to result in a return on the investment made on design? Will it help reduce costs and improve efficiency for the user and service provider?
      • Does the service create value for both the user and service provider and does it have the potential to make use of company and customer resources in a respectful and efficient manner while still creating value?
      • Does the service have the potential to increase value from an engagement, customer loyalty and commercial perspective to both end users and service delivery staff?
    • Sustainability

      • Does the service do more with less and does it have the potential to reduce consumption and increase use?
      • Does the service have ways of evolving according to the variability of human experience and can it adapt to meet unpredictable needs and situations?
      • Has the service been designed with longevity in mind and the ability to be iterative, scalable and adaptable over time?
    • Innovation

      • Is the service truly unique and does it offer a totally new and groundbreaking value proposition? Does it have any world-first features?
      • Is the service based on a truly creative approach resulting in a completely new way of thinking?
      • Does the service use new systems and/or technology in a clever, imaginative and original manner?
    • Impact

      • Does the service have the potential to make a positive difference with the target audience?
      • Will the service make life easier for users and staff working within the system?
      • Does the service have the potential to make a positive impact on society?
  • SOCIAL IMPACT

    Proudly presented by Donkey Wheel and Benefit Capital.

    The main objective of the Social Impact category is to recognise the role of design in creating a better society.

    We define Social Impact as:

    “The creation of something new or the improvement of existing solutions that meet pressing unmet social needs and improve people’s lives. It is the process of inventing and implementing novel solutions to address intractable or ‘wicked’ problems, drive societal change and/or promote environmental sustainability.”


    Evaluation Criteria

    • Design Process

      • Has the project/program been co-designed with the beneficiaries to create a solution that places their needs at the centre?
      • Has the design journey included prototyping and testing to determine the real-life implications and identify any unintended consequences?
      • Is it evident that a clear design process been followed to deliver the project/program?
    • Social Impact

      • Is the intended social impact clear?
      • Has the impact been measured and reported? If so, how is this information recorded and who has it been/will be it shared with?
      • Does the project have a proven track record of contributing to positive social change?
    • Innovation

      • Is the project unique, creative and imaginative?
      • Does it offer a new and ground-breaking value proposition in the social impact sector?
      • Does it have any world-first features?
    • Commercial Sustainability and Scale/Replication Potential

      • Is the project underpinned by an economically sustainable business model?
      • Can the model be replicated or scaled in other contexts (i.e. geographies, demographics, etc)?
      • Have any policy areas and/or community attitudes been identified that need to be addressed to improve the opportunities for scaling or replicating and if so, what is being done to influence or address these?
  • DESIGN STRATEGY

    The main objective of Design Strategy category is to recognise the role of design in driving business strategy. The Design Strategy category has specific evaluation criteria that evaluates how organisations use design as a strategic tool to be more competitive.

    The evaluation criteria is based on the following attributes of a business:

    1. Clear purpose
    2. True customer and market understanding
    3. Willingness for businesses to disrupt themselves
    4. Ability to work concurrently with current and future potential business models
    5. Capacity to own the change process and employ leadership to make implementation possible.

    Evaluation Criteria

    • Clarity of Purpose

      • Does the organisation have a clear purpose that is linked to a clear understanding of the market it operates in?
      • Is it evident that everyone in the organisation can clearly state the core purpose of the business and that they have a sufficient understanding of the business strategy?
      • Has the organisation created an environment where staff are aligned to the vision of the organisation’s desired future?
    • Customer and Market Immersion

      • Is it evident that the organisation understands the needs and motivations of their customers beyond traditional market segmentation?
      • Has the organisation immersed themselves beyond the world of their customer and gained empathy with all stakeholders in their business?
      • Is the customer/market immersion approach understood throughout the company and it is embedded and formally supported within the business?
      • Have the customer/market immersion activities resulted in a clear value proposition?
    • Disruption

      • Does the organisation continually respond to the changing needs and priorities of their customer and adjust its strategy and purpose accordingly?
      • Has the organisation demonstrated that they continually challenge the status quo of the business and explore new opportunities through a process of reflection and reframing?
      • Does the organisation have an innovative business model that looks beyond the current market and helps the business imagine new values, opportunities and new directions?
      • For established businesses, is there evidence of systematic transition to a disruptive business model?
      • For startups, is there evidence of a transition from incubation to scale up execution?
    • Design Leadership

      • Is it evident that the organisation is design-led from the CEO down and is design part of the DNA of the organisation?
      • Has the organisation cultivated a culture of leadership where everyone is inspired and influenced by the power of design to reframe problems and ensure alignment to the firm’s purpose?
      • Is innovation in the organisation understood to be more that just an R&D activity and are the innovation programs in the business design-led?
    • Business Model

      • Has the business model been designed in line with the product/service offering in an innovative way?
      • Is there a clear alignment between the organisation’s products/services, it’s business model and the overall company strategy?
      • Have all elements of the business model been resolved and balanced to meet the firm’s purpose?
  • DESIGN RESEARCH – NEW FOR 2021

    The Design Research category recognises excellence in Design Research across multiple sectors (academia and industry). It was established to showcase the contribution Design Research makes in developing innovative and ground-breaking outcomes.

    Design Research can be defined as scholarly investigations into phenomena in the various design fields where the main aim is the discovery of new knowledge and knowledge advancement in the design fields. In this context, Design Research is understood to be research embedded within the design/research process. It is an approach that design researchers use to understand people, their experiences and future challenges.

    ELIGIBILITY

    • Research still under development is not eligible to enter.
    • Design Research entries must be completed demonstrating research rigour, innovation and tangible outcomes.

    Evaluation Criteria

    • PURPOSE

      • Are the aims, scope and objectives of the investigation clearly stated?
      • Do research questions address a specific gap in this area of research?
      • Have the appropriate research methods been clearly explained and demonstrated?
    • EXECUTION

      • Has the research rigour been well implemented and do the outcomes of the research respond to the original aims and objectives?
      • Have appropriate data collection methods, analysis and results been demonstrated?
      • Does the research promote best practice in the areas of diversity, integrity and ethics by considering aspects including equity, privacy, cultural differences, gender, ethnicity and geography?
    • INNOVATION

      • Are the research methods applied innovative?
      • Has the research resulted in new and novel findings?
      • Does the research demonstrate evidence of tangible innovative outcomes?
    • IMPACT

      • Does the research provide significant intellectual impact (publications)?
      • Does the research provide evidence of commercial impact (e.g. a spin-off company or licencing)?
      • Does the research demonstrate value for its users?
      • Does the outcome of the research provide worthwhile, positive, commercial, societal and/or environmental impacts?